Tuesday Links: TPP, Corbyn, Sanders, etc.

Off Guardian (embedded above), Tony Benn speech on the aims of Thatcherite policies.  Via Gaius Publius, via Naked Capitalism, where they are calling it Tony Benn’s “Ten-Minute History of Neoliberalism.” I found it moving, especially his remarks about Thatcher’s demonization of the miners, and that he’d concluded that these fights have to be re-fought each generation. (More on miners below.)


Gaius Publius, What Sanders Can Accomplish by Not ActingThe blogger known as Gaius Publius (the blog is “Down With Tyranny”) has had a series of posts in support of Bernie Sanders that have been picked up at Naked Capitalism. I don’t like the fact that Sanders is running as a Democrat, and I’m sympathetic with the argument (made well by Margaret Kimberley of Black Agenda Report in this Counterpunch podcast interview) that Sanders will thereby be acting as a “sheepdog” bringing left-ish Democrats into the fold and eventually to vote for Hillary or whoever the nominee is).  But I liked this post, which suggests that Bernie could get some traction by promising not to do a bunch of things that Obama has done: push for horrible “trade” deals like the TPP; aim for dismantling or privatizing Social Security; extend tax breaks for the rich; etc. etc. And GP asks us to think of all the time activists wouldn’t then have to spend fighting such efforts.  Our columnist Jerry Friedman will have an “Economy in Numbers” piece in our Nov/Dec issue about Sanders’ economic policies.

Social Europe, Jeremy Corbyn’s Speech On The EU ReferendumMore sensible talk from the new Labour Party leader.  Attempts in the UK press to undermine Corbyn reached a low when the Sunday Express had this dire report (via HuffPo Uk): Jeremy Corbyn’s Great Great Grandfather Mismanaged A Victorian Workhouse, Sunday Express Claims.  Bernie Sanders doesn’t have it so bad; here the New York Times annoyed Bernie fans with an online piece about the few times Bernie had been mentioned in the Times before he was a public figure, starting with coming in 15th in a high school running race (1956: Bernie Sanders, Running Hard).  Besides the triviality and condescension, the original version of the article had young Bernie coming in dead last, when in fact he was just the last among those ranked to get their names in the paper; his time was apparently pretty good.

Lambert Strether, Naked Capitalism, TPP: It’s Not a Deal, It’s Not a Trade Deal, and It’s Not a Done DealHat-tip TM.  I hope he’s right that this can be turned back; he is definitely right that the done-ness of the deal has been wildly over-reported. See also: Joseph Stiglitz and Adam Hersh, The Trans-Pacific Free-Trade Charade;  Robert Reich video, The Problem with TPP Explained in Two Minutes; and our own John Miller’s piece from our July/August issue, The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Corporate Power Unbound.

Bitch Media, Four Things the Government Should Defund Instead of Planned Parenthood. Including “crisis pregnancy centers,” which get funding in at least eleven states.

Washington Post, How Elizabeth Warren picked a fight with Brookings — and won;  Reuters, Brookings fellow resigns after Senator Warren accuses him of conflicts:  Warren criticized a Brookings affiliate, Robert Litan, for writing a white paper against the Labor Dept.’s proposed fiduciary rule, which would require personal investment advisors to act in their clients’ interests; the guy hadn’t disclosed the finance industry funding he’d gotten for the study. As reported a while back at Naked Capitalism (Congressional Black Caucus Still Trying to Hurt Their Constituents By Killing the Labor Department Fiduciary Rule) and in Mother Jones (The Congressional Black Caucus and the Financial Lobby: BFFs), members of the Congressional Black Caucus have been opposing the fiduciary rule, for some reason. I guess for campaign money, but it’s still pretty shocking. Their argument is that less-well-off Black people will have less access to financial advice if the rule goes through–but why should they want advice that is compromised?

The Independent (Ireland): Imagine this: Sweden moves towards a standard 6-hour working day and The Independent (UK): Sweden introduces six-hour workday.  This supposedly makes workers more efficient (but whatever reason they need to give themselves…).  Hat-tip D&S reader Katharine R.

Center for Public Integrity, Johns Hopkins terminates black lung program: This was a unit of the Johns Hopkins Hospital that, in collusion with coal companies, repeatedly failed to diagnose miners with black lung disease, preventing them from getting disability.  Appears to be a result of an expose by the Center for Public Integrity and ABC News, Breathless and Burdened. Will heads roll?

Too Much online, The Real Secrets to Grand Fortune: Sam Pizzigati interviews Sam Wilkin, author of Wealth Secrets of the One Percent: A Modern Manual to Getting Marvelously, Obscenely Rich, which ingeniously parodies get-rich self-help books as a way of explaining how, via monopoly and intellectual property protection (among other tricks) the super-rich really got their wealth.  I ordered the book.

Thursday Links: Buffett, Chicago/Illinois, Atlanta Teachers


Here are today’s topics, in no particular order:

(1) Warren Buffett, the Greedy Grandfather of Omaha:  Joe Nocera had a puff piece in the New York Times last March invitingly called  How Warren Buffett Does It, discussing the magic of Buffett’s “value investing.” Thankfully, lots of the online comments called b.s. on Nocera, pointing out the unseemly sources of some of Buffett’s wealth. Several comments mentioned the great work of David Cay Johnston, in whose 2012 book The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use “Plain English” and Other Tricks to Rob You Blind Buffett makes several appearances. (Find Steve Pressman’s review of The Fine Print from our Nov/Dec 2012 issue here; check out DCJ’s 2011 Tax Analysts piece, Warren Buffett Wants Your Taxes, on Buffett’s tendency to divert tax dollars into his own pocket; read Dean Baker and David Cay Johnston, in an October 2012 FDL Book Salon on The Fine Print).

Now two more bits of evidence about how Warren Buffett really does it:  First, Naked Capitalism republished Raúl Ilargi Meijer’s Automatic Earth piece, Warren Buffett Is Everything That’s Wrong with America, about Buffett’s plan with Brazilian 3G Capital to merge the food giants Heinz, Kraft, and Oscar Mayer. Here is the money quote: “Buffett, the supposed genius, can only do these deals because nobody demands anybody to pay for the externalities that arise as a result of Warren pushing crap posing as food upon the American people. And then when he’s done getting even richer off of poisoning your kids, he’ll donate billions to their well-being.”

The more shocking recent piece comes from Daniel Wagner and Mike Baker, written for the Center for Public Integrity and the Seattle TimesWarren Buffett’s mobile home empire preys on the poor, with the subtitle “Billionaire profits at every step, from building to selling to high cost lending.” This investigative report is about how Clayton Homes, which is owned by Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway, and which in turn owns a chain of mobile home companies with different names, helps push people into high-priced mobile-home mortgages through predatory lenders also owned by Clayton itself. And Berkshire Hathaway has its hand in the mobile-home manufacturing business too, so the whole predatory web funnels profits from people of modest means into the billionaire’s pockets.

I think it’s time to take to Twitter and ask @WarrenBuffett and @claytonhomes how they respond to the charges made in Daniel Wagner and Mike Baker’s piece Warren Buffett’s mobile home empire preys on the poor.

(2) Chicago and Illinois:  The main election result in Chicago, Rahm “Mayor 1%” Emanuel winning re-election (spending some ten times what his run-off opponent, Jesús “Chuy” García, did) was super-depressing, but even worse, for me, was the fact that Chicago’s UNITE-HERE Local 1 endorsed Emanuel (though with some laudable push-back from other unions in the city, who gleefully mocked the #RahmLove hashtag on Twitter, and by former UNITE-HERE staffers, according to Micah Uetricht’s post, Over 40 Former UNITE HERE Staff, Volunteers Rebuke Union for Endorsing Rahm Emanuel, at Working In These Times.

Just before the elections, Naked Capitalism’s Lambert Strether had a post, Rahm Emanuel and Rick Perry Hold Public in Bipartisan Contempt, about how Chicago’s Emanuel and Texas’s Perry have figured out how to dole out multi-millions of dollars to companies (campaign donors, surely) with no bidding process, no transparency, and no accountability (e.g., about whether the companies create jobs they are supposed to create.

There was at least one (possible) positive outcome to the elections in Chicago, as Kari Lydersen reported, also at Working In These Times: On Chicago’s Southeast Side, Union-backed Sue Sadlowski Garza May Have Defeated a Rahm Emanuel Ally.  Sue Sadlowski Garza was one of several teachers to challenge pro-Rahm incumbents, but I think the only one to get to the run-offs, and she was just a few votes ahead last I checked, but hopefully she will prevail.

And Chicagoans also have to worry about Governor 1%: Bruce Rauner. In great interview from a while ago on Doug Henwood’s Behind the News, longtime lefty union organizer Jane McAlevey talks about Gov. Bruce Rauner’s attack on public-sector unions in Illinois, and about how the reactionaries like Rauner have an analysis of power that they pursue with precision, and the left needs to get one instead of floundering around. She made similar arguments in a piece in The NationWe Need Syriza in Illinois.

There was a lot of fuss on The Facebook among progressives about the so-called “religious freedom” law in Indiana, and rightly so. Mainstream and right-wing commentators claimed that the Indiana law was the same as the federal law and the law in a bunch of other states–but they were wrong. (David Brooks, unsurprisingly, was one of those to get it wrong (here).) The two best pieces I saw on this were from Garrett Epps in The Atlantic (What Makes Indiana’s Religious-Freedom Law Different?), and from Bill Black at New Economic Perspectives (The Homophobic Law and the Indiana Governor Who Dares Not Speak Its Purpose, plus this post responding to criticisms). Indiana has no LGBT anti-discrimination law, for one thing; but Bill very usefully points out how the Indiana law pointedly drafted to be extreme. (What I thought was the really wacky part of the law was the provision that allows you to make up your own religion: “Sec. 5. As used in this chapter, ‘exercise of religion’ includes any exercise of religion, whether or not compelled by, or central to, a system of religious belief.”

But once you listen to Jane McAlevey on Rauner’s coup in Illinois, you’ll wish there were as much of an uproar on social media about what’s going on in Illinois as there has been about what’s going on in Indiana.

(3) Atlanta Teachers vs. Wall Street Bankers:  Bill Black had a great post on New Economic Perspectives (cross-posted on Naked Capitalism) about the recent sentencing to prison of teachers who changed their students’ high-stakes test scores: We Send Teachers to Prison for Rigging the Numbers, Why Not Bankers? Bill focuses on all the investigative and prosecutorial resources that went into the cheating scandal, when massive bank fraud is considered too difficult to prosecute. David Dayen made similar points at The Fiscal Times (The Biggest Outrage in Atlanta’s Crazy Teacher Cheating Case), but he emphasizes (what I’m betting Bill would agree with) that it’s not obvious the teachers should have been prosecuted at all.

And there was this really wonderful unsigned (as far as I could tell) post at the Crunk Feminist Collective website: Teachers Are Not Magical Negroes–an homage to teachers who encourage Black students to succeed, connecting their struggles to the Atlanta cheating scandal (or the scandal of the harsh punishment those teachers received). Money quote: “We treat smart Black kids and dedicated Black teachers like magical Negro unicorns that can individually save the world when the truth is that we need massive dedicated resources and structures to support us. We put students and teachers in impossible positions, berate them daily, and then wonder why our school systems are struggling. If we really believe that black lives matter, they need to matter in the classroom and in the schoolhouse too.” (For an explanation of the “Magical Negro” trope, see this entry at the wonderful and often radical TV Tropes site, or this Wikipedia entry.)

–Chris Sturr