Notes and Links on the Democratic Primaries

A round-up of some of the best things I’ve seen on the battle so far between Clinton and Sanders:

Gerald Friedman, What Would Sanders Do.  We have posted the research report by Friedman that is the basis of his two columns for us, What Would Sanders Do?, Part 1: The Dynamic Effects of Seven Sanders Initiatives, and What Would Sanders Do?, Part 2: Wages, Poverty, and Inequality. Soon we will post Friedman’s column for our March/April issue, “Bernie Sanders’s Health Care Revolution,” with the numbers behind Sanders’s “Improved Medicare for All.” We have already posted the research report behind that: Friedman Response to Thorpe. (Meanwhile, the Times mentioned Jerry Friedman in Left-Leaning Economists Question Cost of Bernie Sanders’s Plans, but didn’t bother to interview him. They seem to have scoured the universe for left critics of Sanders; as Lambert Strether of Naked Capitalism says, “When Jared Bernstein is at the far left, you know you’re looking at establishment stenography.” And I loved Matt Taibbi’s tweets about this article: “The hysterical concern over how to pay for Bernie’s plans is hilarious. Nobody worries about how we afford the F-35. Nor do we ask how we afford non-negotiated Medicare drugs, the Littoral Combat Ship, the carried interest tax break, or other idiocies.”)  And a reminder:  the whole point is that single-payer would cost less than the current system, and provide health care to many more people.

Holly Wood, The Village VoiceFeeling the Yern: Why One Millennial Woman Would Rather Go to Hell than Vote for Hillary. A hilarious riposte to Madeleine Albright’s “there’s a special place in Hell” remark. Best parts: “Capitalism, as Vonnegut explained, is ‘what the people with all our money, drunk or sober, sane or insane, decided to do today.” And: “there’s a special place in Hell for war criminals who launch hedge funds.”

Bhaskar Sunkara, Aljazeera America: Enter the Sanders Democrat:
Whether or not he defeats Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders has awakened a powerful new constituency. Excellent analysis from the founding editor of Jacobin.

Benjamin Studebaker, at his blog, Why Bernie vs Hillary Matters More Than People Think (also at HuffPo). A great blog post that has a bigger historical perspective, with some economics.

Benjamin Studebaker, at his blog, Why Bernie Sanders Is More Electable than People Think.  A follow-up, also very good.

Jeff Spross, The Week: How class could eventually remake the Democratic Party. Similar to Sunkara’s article.

Jedediah Purdy, Huffington Post: Dismissing Sanders: Democratic Condescension and the Mythic Political Grown-up.  Takes on Paul Krugman and the New Yorker‘s Alexandra Schwartz.

Thomas Piketty in the Guardian (originally in Le Monde): Thomas Piketty on the rise of Bernie Sanders: the US enters a new political era.  More recent than the others; similar points.

Greenmountainboy, Daily Kos, Crossover Appeal: Bernie Sanders Wins 2,095 Write In Votes in Republican Primary – Washington Post.  The WashPo article is Bernie Sanders won 2,095 votes in the New Hampshire Republican primary; the headline sums it up. Find the official NH results from the Secretary of State here (for the Republican side) and here (for the Democrat side).  This on top of his having gotten more NH primary votes than any candidate in either party ever, and having won by a larger margin, than in any contested NH primary in either party in history.

I agree that the votes he got in the Republican primary is a good sign for Sanders’s crossover appeal (about four times as many as Clinton got, by the way).  But as someone who lives in NH and who canvassed for Sanders here, I don’t think it is quite as good a sign as some people are making it out to be.  As most people know, NH is an “open primary” state, which means that you don’t have to be a party member to vote in a party’s primary. But I think most people don’t know the mechanics of how it works here:  you can only vote in (e.g.) the Democratic Party’s primary if, when you walk into the polls, you are registered as a Democrat or if you are unaffiliated, in which case, on the day of voting, you can switch your registration to Democrat. If you walk into the polls registered as a Republican, you can only vote in the Republican primary. (I think you can switch your affiliation up to two weeks before the primary.)  Also, many NH voters strategically switch their party affiliation (switching it back to “unaffiliated” or to the other party after they vote) depending on where they think they can have a meaningful impact. But some people forget to switch their affiliation back. Given all this, I think it’s likely that many of the people who wrote in Sanders (or Clinton) in the Republican primary may have been Democratic-leaning unaffiliated voters, or even people who are “really” Democrats (i.e., that’s where their heart is and they are usually registered as Democrats), but who had forgotten to switch their affiliation back after some previous election.  Still, I think it’s true that there’s great crossover appeal for Sanders among Republicans.  Evidence: a relative of mine, who is normally a registered Republican and went into the primary intending to vote for Chris Christie, discovered when she walked in that she was still registered as a Democrat from some previous election. So she voted for Bernie. (Don’t ask me how she can support both Christie and Bernie, but I still think it’s a good sign for Bernie that there are people like this out there.)

Tuesday Links: TPP, Corbyn, Sanders, etc.

Off Guardian (embedded above), Tony Benn speech on the aims of Thatcherite policies.  Via Gaius Publius, via Naked Capitalism, where they are calling it Tony Benn’s “Ten-Minute History of Neoliberalism.” I found it moving, especially his remarks about Thatcher’s demonization of the miners, and that he’d concluded that these fights have to be re-fought each generation. (More on miners below.)

 

Gaius Publius, What Sanders Can Accomplish by Not ActingThe blogger known as Gaius Publius (the blog is “Down With Tyranny”) has had a series of posts in support of Bernie Sanders that have been picked up at Naked Capitalism. I don’t like the fact that Sanders is running as a Democrat, and I’m sympathetic with the argument (made well by Margaret Kimberley of Black Agenda Report in this Counterpunch podcast interview) that Sanders will thereby be acting as a “sheepdog” bringing left-ish Democrats into the fold and eventually to vote for Hillary or whoever the nominee is).  But I liked this post, which suggests that Bernie could get some traction by promising not to do a bunch of things that Obama has done: push for horrible “trade” deals like the TPP; aim for dismantling or privatizing Social Security; extend tax breaks for the rich; etc. etc. And GP asks us to think of all the time activists wouldn’t then have to spend fighting such efforts.  Our columnist Jerry Friedman will have an “Economy in Numbers” piece in our Nov/Dec issue about Sanders’ economic policies.

Social Europe, Jeremy Corbyn’s Speech On The EU ReferendumMore sensible talk from the new Labour Party leader.  Attempts in the UK press to undermine Corbyn reached a low when the Sunday Express had this dire report (via HuffPo Uk): Jeremy Corbyn’s Great Great Grandfather Mismanaged A Victorian Workhouse, Sunday Express Claims.  Bernie Sanders doesn’t have it so bad; here the New York Times annoyed Bernie fans with an online piece about the few times Bernie had been mentioned in the Times before he was a public figure, starting with coming in 15th in a high school running race (1956: Bernie Sanders, Running Hard).  Besides the triviality and condescension, the original version of the article had young Bernie coming in dead last, when in fact he was just the last among those ranked to get their names in the paper; his time was apparently pretty good.

Lambert Strether, Naked Capitalism, TPP: It’s Not a Deal, It’s Not a Trade Deal, and It’s Not a Done DealHat-tip TM.  I hope he’s right that this can be turned back; he is definitely right that the done-ness of the deal has been wildly over-reported. See also: Joseph Stiglitz and Adam Hersh, The Trans-Pacific Free-Trade Charade;  Robert Reich video, The Problem with TPP Explained in Two Minutes; and our own John Miller’s piece from our July/August issue, The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Corporate Power Unbound.

Bitch Media, Four Things the Government Should Defund Instead of Planned Parenthood. Including “crisis pregnancy centers,” which get funding in at least eleven states.

Washington Post, How Elizabeth Warren picked a fight with Brookings — and won;  Reuters, Brookings fellow resigns after Senator Warren accuses him of conflicts:  Warren criticized a Brookings affiliate, Robert Litan, for writing a white paper against the Labor Dept.’s proposed fiduciary rule, which would require personal investment advisors to act in their clients’ interests; the guy hadn’t disclosed the finance industry funding he’d gotten for the study. As reported a while back at Naked Capitalism (Congressional Black Caucus Still Trying to Hurt Their Constituents By Killing the Labor Department Fiduciary Rule) and in Mother Jones (The Congressional Black Caucus and the Financial Lobby: BFFs), members of the Congressional Black Caucus have been opposing the fiduciary rule, for some reason. I guess for campaign money, but it’s still pretty shocking. Their argument is that less-well-off Black people will have less access to financial advice if the rule goes through–but why should they want advice that is compromised?

The Independent (Ireland): Imagine this: Sweden moves towards a standard 6-hour working day and The Independent (UK): Sweden introduces six-hour workday.  This supposedly makes workers more efficient (but whatever reason they need to give themselves…).  Hat-tip D&S reader Katharine R.

Center for Public Integrity, Johns Hopkins terminates black lung program: This was a unit of the Johns Hopkins Hospital that, in collusion with coal companies, repeatedly failed to diagnose miners with black lung disease, preventing them from getting disability.  Appears to be a result of an expose by the Center for Public Integrity and ABC News, Breathless and Burdened. Will heads roll?

Too Much online, The Real Secrets to Grand Fortune: Sam Pizzigati interviews Sam Wilkin, author of Wealth Secrets of the One Percent: A Modern Manual to Getting Marvelously, Obscenely Rich, which ingeniously parodies get-rich self-help books as a way of explaining how, via monopoly and intellectual property protection (among other tricks) the super-rich really got their wealth.  I ordered the book.